Wilfred Owen, Greater Love, WWI poet

Greater Love

37f39fd0ddab8bceafebf1b9a7349554--man-ray-photography-black-lips

 

Red lips are not so red

As the stained stones kissed by the English dead.

Kindness of wooed and wooer

Seems shame to their love pure.

O Love, your eyes lose lure

When I behold eyes blinded in my stead!

 

Your slender attitude

Trembles not exquisite like limbs knife-skewed,

Rolling and rolling there

Where God seems not to care:

Till the fierce love they bear

Cramps them in death’s extreme decrepitude.

 

Your voice sings not so soft,—

Though even as wind murmuring through raftered loft,—

Your dear voice is not dear,

Gentle, and evening clear,

As theirs whom none now hear,

Now earth has stopped their piteous mouths that coughed.

 

Heart, you were never hot

Nor large, nor full like hearts made great with shot;

And though your hand be pale,

Paler are all which trail

Your cross through flame and hail:

Weep, you may weep, for you may touch them not.

 

                                               Wilfred Owen

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About kinneret

Hello, and welcome. I'm writing this blog under an alias. Why an alias? I started to write what may be described as an "American Gothic" novel (sort of Henry James/ Franz Kafka with violence) with some autobiographical details. ..when I started this blog I just decided to use the alias. This blog is about art and art history, but my interests also include literature, film analysis, psychology, forensic psychology, faerie tale analysis, cognitive therapy, cognitive linguistics, classical theater, World War II, and Russian and British history. My favorite writers include Kafka, the Brontes, and Philip K Dick. Thank you for reading this blog and I will happily reply to any comments.
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2 Responses to Wilfred Owen, Greater Love, WWI poet

  1. marblenecltr says:

    Poem and photograph well matched. Don’t remember that war, of course, but knew a few who were in it and lived through those days. “Piteous mouths that coughed,” epidemic tuberculosis took place, and signs forbidding expectoration were posted. Spanish flu was also common. Let us hope that the pneumonic plague of Madagascar soon comes to an end. Public health in a U.S. territory without water and electricity (Puerto Rico) deserves much of our attention.

  2. marblenecltr says:

    Reblogged this on necltr and commented:
    Great day of the year! Set my clocks back an hour, give me more needed time to solve the problems of the world! I am on it!

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