Alfred Eisenstaedt, Cape Cod 1940

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About kinneret

Hello, and welcome. I'm writing this blog under an alias. Why an alias? I started to write what may be described as an "American Gothic" novel (sort of Henry James/ Franz Kafka with violence) with some autobiographical details. ..when I started this blog I just decided to use the alias. This blog is about art and art history, but my interests also include literature, film analysis, psychology, forensic psychology, faerie tale analysis, cognitive therapy, cognitive linguistics, classical theater, World War II, and Russian and British history. My favorite writers include Kafka, the Brontes, and Philip K Dick. Thank you for reading this blog and I will happily reply to any comments.
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2 Responses to Alfred Eisenstaedt, Cape Cod 1940

  1. marblenecltr says:

    Good picture, Alfred, perhaps the inspiration for the later photograph of Marilyn Monroe on a New York sidewalk. The beach is a reminder of the cold water on similar beaches, sodas (called “tonics” here, for belief that they helped calm the nerves, esp. drinks like Moxie) in glass bottles, but, during wartime, gobs of tar or asphalt from. ship’s, merchant and military and including submarines.
    Back to the bottles, they were returnable for 2¢ each for economic reasons only, they were reused by all bottlers, Coca Cola and Moxie alike, and boys would go about seeking candy money for ourselves (Hershey bar, 5¢ or less for more than twice the chocolate today). Also, Coca Cola was Coca Cola, made with real sugar and bottled in green-hued, heavy, hour glass shaped bottles with which it was incorrectly said that one could drive a nail. Thumbtack, brad, perhaps.

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