Time in photos

When you see a random photo from a long time ago, you have the urge to dismiss the immediacy of it (and the transience of time) and say to yourself “that happened so long ago” or even “well, they’re dead and I’m alive.” This is especially easy when you are young, so that even when you look at pictures of young people, they seem so old, removed, remote, because the photo is in black and white, because of their dress an9eb2fab1cca2c2023a7d642e0ae1d729.pngd posture and mannerisms, because you know it was taken a long time ago. But w9eb2fab1cca2c2023a7d642e0ae1d729.pngas you get older, you start to think “How odd… I am looking at the photo of someone who is young–say 20, and I’m twice that now, (or whatever), but they are already long dead!” Time starts to assume a transient, confusing, and menacing character. If you look through thousands or tens of thousands of historical photos, as I have done, it all becomes even stranger, as you start to recognize very easily differences just between decades, and ten years is no time at all. and you see how all of our stars and starlets lived and died, that all lives eventually lead to the graveyard, and it is sobering. And you see a photo like this from 1917, and you realize, we al on this world have only one chance to live (unless you believe in reincarnation) and some have really lived, and others have not; these people, from 1917 in Colorado, lived.

 

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About kinneret

Hello, and welcome. I'm writing this blog under an alias. Why an alias? I started to write what may be described as an "American Gothic" novel (sort of Henry James/ Franz Kafka with violence) with some autobiographical details. ..when I started this blog I just decided to use the alias. This blog is about art and art history, but my interests also include literature, film analysis, psychology, forensic psychology, faerie tale analysis, cognitive therapy, cognitive linguistics, classical theater, World War II, and Russian and British history. My favorite writers include Kafka, the Brontes, and Philip K Dick. Thank you for reading this blog and I will happily reply to any comments.
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