Worker at Carbon Black Plant, 1942

It’s difficult to see many photos. Tonight it was pictures of the Depression and the tired dehumanized look of the Dust Bowl farmers, brave WWII pilots in training looking young and wistful and probably realizing they won’t live until 20. Here is another touching portrait of a worker toiling no doubt for war industry, and in a carbon plant he will not live long, yet still has a cigarette dangling from his ashy mouth. When seeing such pictures, you wonder why our generation is so discontent when it has had so much and has sacrificed nothing. Taken by FSA/Vachon, John.

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About kinneret

Hello, and welcome. I'm writing this blog under an alias. Why an alias? I started to write what may be described as an "American Gothic" novel (sort of Henry James/ Franz Kafka with violence) with some autobiographical details. ..when I started this blog I just decided to use the alias. This blog is about art and art history, but my interests also include literature, film analysis, psychology, forensic psychology, faerie tale analysis, cognitive therapy, cognitive linguistics, classical theater, World War II, and Russian and British history. My favorite writers include Kafka, the Brontes, and Philip K Dick. Thank you for reading this blog and I will happily reply to any comments.
This entry was posted in documentary photography, photography, portrait, Uncategorized, war, war photography, World War II. Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Worker at Carbon Black Plant, 1942

  1. marblenecltr says:

    Your remark regarding our generation (not mine, really) being angry about circumstances merits much thought and comment. Here is my small contribution: their problems are based on the fact that they have no real problems. One need not be a totally pampered, undisciplined child of wealthy parents to have the attitude of a spoiled rich brat. We all have the same failings and require the same training.
    The photograph is excellent, one of many taken the age of hardship, one of many that should be seen today by all.

  2. marblenecltr says:

    Reblogged this on necltr and commented:
    This photograph is a needed reminder for the old and instructor for the young that the good old days were far from good. Let us be grateful for what we have and add to to it rather than destroy the work of those before us.

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