William Blake and Linda Anne Landers, Song No. 6

She was inspired by his poetry.Owned by the Vanderbuilt collection.

BlakeLanders-Song-20130611SG042

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About kinneret

Hello, and welcome. I'm writing this blog under an alias. Why an alias? I started to write what may be described as an "American Gothic" novel (sort of Henry James/ Franz Kafka with violence) with some autobiographical details. ..when I started this blog I just decided to use the alias. This blog is about art and art history, but my interests also include literature, film analysis, psychology, forensic psychology, faerie tale analysis, cognitive therapy, cognitive linguistics, classical theater, World War II, and Russian and British history. My favorite writers include Kafka, the Brontes, and Philip K Dick. Thank you for reading this blog and I will happily reply to any comments.
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4 Responses to William Blake and Linda Anne Landers, Song No. 6

  1. marblenecltr says:

    Good art for a great poet who did better than good art himself.

    • kinneret says:

      He was an amazing poet, and his art is beautiful too. I don’t know which is more beautiful but his poetry is stunning. Have you seen his illuminated works at the Tate Gallery in London? They take your breath away.

      • marblenecltr says:

        No, I haven’t been to the Tate where there is so much to see. As I probably never will, I rely on you to bring it to me. I can’t complain, I have seen the one-time home of Louis XIII, now the Louvre and before that glass monstrosity was parked before it, Les Invalides and Napoleon’s Tomb (I was told by an Egyptian present at the time that it was the most beautiful tomb he had seen), and the Boston Museum of Fine Arts. There is so much for lessons in art and history in the many museums most worthy of visits. An example is the Ninevah Gate in Berlin-let us be grateful it is there, for, if it had been left “in situ” it probably have been destroyed, if not by the Huns of a much earlier age, then by those of today.

  2. kinneret says:

    Absolutely, you are right. I once visited Berlin, and for only a short time, but I got to see some of the amazing pillage from Egypt including Nefrititi. If left in Egypt it could have been destroyed, sacked (stolen but not put in a museum!) or just disintegrated. I hope that the British don’t return all of the things they have pillaged as that would leave little in their museums…

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